Test.
Deutsch English|

Mytek Brooklyn

23.06.2016 // Dirk Sommer

About four years ago, the Mytek 192-DSD-DAC impressed me with its sound in a way that caused me to abstain from purchasing expensive D/A converters for quite a while. This is not bad at all in times of rapid new developments. After a venture into high-end territory, these digital experts with roots in the pro audio realm are now introducing the Brooklyn.

At first glance, this new converter seems to be the perfect synthesis of the plain looking 192-DSD-DAC which was designed primarily for studio use, but became very popular with the hi-fi crowd due to its almost unbeatable price-performance ratio in terms of sound, despite its slight weaknesses in menu navigation, and the Manhattan. This model, with its very individual chassis design, its large and easily readable display, and consequently a higher price tag was clearly aimed at a hi-fi/high-end clientele. The Brooklyn ($1995) inherited its top cover emblazoned with the company logo and the structured front panel from the Manhattan. However, the four push buttons do not have the same carefully milled surface that discreetly and inconspicuously made them integrate into the Manhattan's front surface. Instead, the Brooklyn sports an LED-lit Mytek logo in the left corner of the chassis, whose colours can be customised via the now incredibly easy-to-operate user menu. While the colour customisation is a nice gimmick, the new menu navigation eliminates the only real weakness of the previous model.

The two headphone jacks allow balanced connection of a pair of headphones via an adapter. The amplifier is capable of delivering up to six watts of output power.
The two headphone jacks allow balanced connection of a pair of headphones via an adapter. The amplifier is capable of delivering up to six watts of output power.

In the Brooklyn's display, four user selectable parameters are shown, including their current value and a description such as "USB" or "Input". The parameter and its name appear on the left part of the display. When pressing the leftmost button on the front panel, the colour of the shown setting changes. The rotary knob can then be used to adjust it. Another push of the button ends the procedure. In this mode, turning the large black rotary encoder causes the next four menu items to be displayed, which can then be adjusted upon pressing the appropriate button on the front panel. The Brooklyn's menu offers access to 14 settings, including brightness and—as previously mentioned—the background colour of the Mytek logo. Thanks to the new, well thought-out menu navigation, you always know what you are doing. This is a major improvement over the Stereo 192-DSD-DAC!

But also in other areas, the Brooklyn has more to offer than its predecessor. In the menu, the analogue inputs can be configured for line, phono MM, and phono MC sources. In combination with its analogue volume control, this makes the Brooklyn a complete preamplifier. The only drawback is that you have to swap cables on the single pair of RCA inputs when switching between line and phono sources. There is simply no space left for a second or third pair on the back panel of the Mytek. With the Stereo 192-DSD-DAC you still had to choose between a mastering and a preamp version. The former offered a SDIF-3 input for DSD and a fairly coarse LED level meter, while the latter was equipped with a line-level analogue input. As previously mentioned, the Brooklyn offers an analogue input that is also suitable for phono sources as well as the SDIF-3 input. However, the lack of space on the rear panel makes it necessary to use the two S/PDIF RCA inputs for this. In the menu item "Coax Function" you can set either of the two RCA sockets to function as two S/PDIF or SDIF-3 for one of the two stereo channels. As always, the corresponding word clock input is present in the form of a BNC socket.

The success of the Stereo 192-DSD-DAC has given Mytek more self-consciousness. The top cover and the front panel are now emblazoned with the company logo; the one on the front has coloured back-lighting. The LED's shade can be determined by the user.
The success of the Stereo 192-DSD-DAC has given Mytek more self-consciousness. The top cover and the front panel are now emblazoned with the company logo; the one on the front has coloured back-lighting. The LED's shade can be determined by the user.


  • Very Fine Solutions präsentiert den MSB Reference DAC

    Frank Vermeylen ist nicht nur der Inhaber des belgischen High-End-Vertriebs Very Fine Solutions, sondern auch der Europa-Statthalter von MSB Technology. Er hatte zur Eröffnung seines neuen Show-Rooms und zur Premiere des MSB Reference geladen, überraschte aber mit einem Konzept für ein Haus voller Kultur. Vor einiger Zeit erwog Frank Vermeylen mit Jonathan Gullman, dem Besitzer und CEO von MSB, ein Gebäude für die Präsentation der noblen Wandler und Verstärker in Europa anzumieten. Doch schließlich entschied…
    31.03.2017
  • Wells Audio Milo

    Falls Ihnen der Milo bekannt vorkommt, ist das kein Déjà-vu-Erlebnis: Im Bericht über die Messe in Warschau hatte ich Ihnen den originell gestalteten Kopfhörerverstärker und seinen Schöpfer Jeff Wells bereits vorgestellt. Das Testexemplar schickten nun die Kopfhörer- und Digital-Spezialisten von audioNEXT nach Gröbenzell. Für das gelungene Design des Milo gibt es zwei Gründe. Zumindest auf den einen wäre ich ohne Jeff Wells Informationen per E-mail von allein wohl nicht gekommen, während der erste leicht nachvollziehbar…
    24.03.2017
  • Melco N1ZH60

    If you were looking for a way to archive and play your hires audio files without using a PC or a laptop and without having to go through complicated installation procedures, your best choices until recently were the entry level Melco N1A or the high-end model of the same company, the N1S, which comes with a considerably more expensive price tag. Melco's newest offering, the N1ZH60, is now positioned nicely between the to other models.…
    16.02.2017
     
  • Mytek goes mobile: Clef™

    Die Digitalspezialisten von Mytek zeigen auf der heute beginnenden Consumers Electronic Show in Las Vegas den mobilen Hi-Res-Wandler, Verstärker und MQA-Decoder Clef™. Die Studioprofis von Mytek in New York (Entwicklung) und Warschau (Entwicklung und Fertigung) haben sich in den letzten Jahren mit dem 192-DSD-DAC, dem Manhattan und dem Brooklyn auch in der Hifi-Szene einen guten Ruf erarbeitet. Nun präsentieren sie ihr erstes Produkt, das allein für den Musikgenuss entwickelt wurde: die Clef™ genannte Kombination aus…
    05.01.2017
  • Mytek stellt Manhattan II vor

    Myteks umfangreiche Kenntnisse im Profibereich schlagen sich in ihrem zweiten DAC mit MQA-Decoding nieder. Auch der branchenweit erste MQA-fähige ADC stammt von Mytek. Mytek Digital erwarb die zweite MQA®-Lizenz nach Meridian und nun steht die Auslieferung des Manhattan II, eines audiophilen Wandler mit MQA-Technologie kurz bevor. Aber der neue Manhattan II ist viel mehr als das und verkörpert viele Verbesserungen und Innovationen gegenüber dem ursprünglichen Manhattan DAC. Der Manhattan II ist ein Referenz-USB- und -Netzwerk-DAC,…
    15.12.2016
  • SPL Headphone Monitoring Amplifier Modul

    Mit dem HPm Headphone Monitoring Amplifier präsentiert SPL einen Kopfhörerverstärker mit Phonitor-Matrix für die 500er-Serie. Mit dem Headphone Monitoring Amp HPm hält die SPL-Phonitor-Matrix Einzug in die Welt der 500er-Racks. Die zwei getrennt regelbaren Kopfhörerausgänge besitzen jeweils separate Verstärkerstufen für eine qualitativ hochwertige Kopfhörersignalverstärkung. Die Phonitor-Matrix, die aus dem High-End-Kopfhörerverstärker „Phonitor“ abgeleitet wurde, eliminiert den Super-Stereo-Effekt, der bei traditionellen Kopfhörerverstärkern auftritt. In Fällen, in denen Lautsprecher-Abhören nicht möglich oder eine Alternative dazu gewünscht ist, erlaubt…
    01.12.2016